Normal view

Romanland : ethnicity and empire in Byzantium / Anthony Kaldellis.

By: Kaldellis, Anthony [author.].
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookLanguage: eng.Publisher: London : The Belknap Press of Harvad University Press, 2019Description: xv, 373 p. ; maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780674986510.Subject(s): Romans -- Byzantine Empire | Romans -- Ethnic identity | National characteristics, Roman | Cultural pluralism -- Byzantine Empire | Byzantine Empire -- Civilization -- Roman influences | Byzantine Empire -- Ethnic relations | Byzantine Empire -- HistoryDDC classification: 305.80094950902
Contents:
Part I. Romans: A history of denial -- Roman ethnicity -- Romanland -- Part II. Others: Ethnic assimilation -- The Armenian fallacy -- Was Byzantium an empire in the tenth century? -- The apogee of empire in the eleventh century.
Summary: Was there ever such a thing as the Byzantine Empire and who were those self-professed Romans we choose to call "Byzantine" today? At the heart of these two interlinked questions is Anthony Kaldellis's assertion that empires are, by definition, multiethnic. If there was indeed such a thing as the Byzantine Empire, which rules bounded majority and minority ethnic groups? The labels for the minority groups in Byzantium are clear - Slavs, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, Muslims. What was the ethnicity of the majority group? Historical evidence tells us unequivocally that no card-carrying Byzantine ever called himself "Byzantine." He would identify as Roman. This line of identification was so strong in the eastern empire that even the conquering Ottomans saw themselves as inheritors of the Roman Empire. In Western scholarship, however, there has been a long tradition of denying Romanness to Byzantium. In the Middle Ages, people of the eastern empire were made "Greeks," and by the nineteenth century they were shorn of their distorted Greekness and turned "Byzantine." In Romanland, Kaldellis argues that it is time for historians to take the Romanness of Byzantines seriously so that we can better understand the relations between Romans and non-Romans, as well as the processes of assimilation that led to the absorption of foreign groups into the Roman genos.--
List(s) this item appears in: Arrival
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book Book Nehru Memorial Museum Library
305.80094950902 Q9 (Browse shelf) Available 188371

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-361) and index.

Part I. Romans: A history of denial -- Roman ethnicity -- Romanland -- Part II. Others: Ethnic assimilation -- The Armenian fallacy -- Was Byzantium an empire in the tenth century? -- The apogee of empire in the eleventh century.

Was there ever such a thing as the Byzantine Empire and who were those self-professed Romans we choose to call "Byzantine" today? At the heart of these two interlinked questions is Anthony Kaldellis's assertion that empires are, by definition, multiethnic. If there was indeed such a thing as the Byzantine Empire, which rules bounded majority and minority ethnic groups? The labels for the minority groups in Byzantium are clear - Slavs, Bulgarians, Armenians, Jews, Muslims. What was the ethnicity of the majority group? Historical evidence tells us unequivocally that no card-carrying Byzantine ever called himself "Byzantine." He would identify as Roman. This line of identification was so strong in the eastern empire that even the conquering Ottomans saw themselves as inheritors of the Roman Empire. In Western scholarship, however, there has been a long tradition of denying Romanness to Byzantium. In the Middle Ages, people of the eastern empire were made "Greeks," and by the nineteenth century they were shorn of their distorted Greekness and turned "Byzantine." In Romanland, Kaldellis argues that it is time for historians to take the Romanness of Byzantines seriously so that we can better understand the relations between Romans and non-Romans, as well as the processes of assimilation that led to the absorption of foreign groups into the Roman genos.--

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

© Nehru Memorial Museum & Library, Teen Murti House, New Delhi-110011

Telephone No. 011-23794407 & E-Mail: lio.nmml@gov.in